Introduction to Coaching

The New Year is a convenient time to make changes big and small. We make resolutions and goals in an attempt to alter the fabric of our lives for the better. Here at the Feedback Loop, we’re going to be altering our content for 2017 (hopefully for the better). We’ll still be bringing you quality blog posts on the art of feedback and reviews on a weekly basis every Tuesday, but there’s going to be more consistency to the material in two important ways. First, we’re going to have themed

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Refresh Your Advancement Reviews

Advancement reviews are some of the most important reviews that we give judges, and they often serve as an introduction to the peer review process itself. They not only remind judges of what happened during the interview and exam portion of the advancement process but also provide tools for success at their new level. With a failed advancement review, these benefits are even more crucial. The judge needs more than a handful of study tips. The failed advancement review can connect the judge to

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Scaling Feedback for New L1s

Remember how it felt when you first heard “Welcome to Level 1?” I often ask judges why they joined the program, and as a result, I’ve heard a number of humorous and inspiring stories. No matter how different each judge’s reasons and motivations have been, stories about achieving Level 1 typically share a similar response to the achievement -- a combination of personal pride and self-conscious uncertainty at what comes next. This is why it is so important that we provide meaningful

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Feedbag #7: Leading a Horse to Water

Hello and welcome to the latest edition of the Feedbag! Last time, we covered the subject of review drafts. This month, our question is about how to help enable feedback when you’re in a leadership role: I’m team leading at an upcoming event, and I’d like to encourage my team to review each other. Do you recommend any strategies or approaches that have worked well in facilitating review exchanges and/or making sure that the reviews are actually written after the event? This question is actually

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Say Anything.

You know, writing and judging really have a lot in common. That probably has something to do with why I enjoy both of them so much. One of those things, one that it took me an incredibly long time to get over, is that it’s hard to know how you’re doing unless someone else tells you. This isn’t a solo quest. When you write something, you know what you meant to say. You know how you intended it to come across. You can clearly see the brilliance of your vision. And that’s the problem.

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