Dealing With Failures, Part Three

Mais uma vez, olá a todos! (Once again, hello everyone!) We’ve talked about the nature of the beast. We’ve talked about how to tame the beast. This time, however, we’ll talk about ourselves - mostly, what do we do once we’ve taken control of the impact failure has, and how we use that in the future. This will ensure that not only we succeed instead of fail, but can teach others from our experience.   Ask for and accept help Even harder than admitting your mistakes to

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Dealing With Failures, Part Two

Olá a todos! (Hello, everyone!) In the first part, we got to learn a little bit more about failures: what they are, where they live, what they eat. Jokes aside, we spoke a bit about personal experiences and the impact it has on ourselves, our team, and ultimately our event and our customers - the players. In this part, we’ll talk a bit more on how to approach and tame the effects of failure. As I said before, failure always has a negative impact. However, that doesn’t mean it can’t

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Dealing With Failures, Part One

While very gratifying, the job of a judge isn’t always easy: along with hours of study and preparation, we also have numerous moments where we have to make difficult decisions during tournaments. As prepared as we may be, it’s difficult to anticipate every situation, and as a result, we make mistakes; mistakes that oftentimes cause disappointment for a player, fellow judge, or even accidentally interrupt the flow of the whole tournament.   These kinds of situations have a tendency

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Mentoring

Mentoring. Mentor. Mentee. If you had to choose only one concept to pair with the judge program, most people would nod their head towards this one. From day one as a judge candidate to judges at highest levels of leadership in the program, it is everywhere. I came to judging from an educational background, so I didn’t really think twice about mentoring since it was already a large part of what I did with my time. But as I started prepping for writing an overview of what mentoring is, I came

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Buying In

In a perfect world, feedback would would be freely given and freely received. Reviewers would be open and honest about what they had to say, and those being reviewed would open their minds to what others were saying, even if it wasn't necessarily what they want to hear. Unfortunately, we don't live in a perfect world, and it's a lot harder to provide feedback in a way that makes someone want to listen than it is to just write a review. As a reviewer, you need to figure out how to get your reader

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“You Always Do What You’re Told.”

I really enjoy working Side Events at a Grand Prix - there are tons of moving parts and it's a big puzzle to solve. There's usually a jam-packed schedule full of events as well as on-demand events launching whenever they fill. As such, it can sometimes be very stressful to be around the stage. I envy a number of scorekeepers in just how calm they are able to be when they have a multitude of different priorities flying in front of them. is one of those scorekeepers that I hold in high esteem. No

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What’s Your 100?

This week, The Feedback Loop continues its celebration of 100 posts with your thoughts on feedback. Many thanks to the dozens of judges from around the world who contributed! If you missed the deadline, it's not too late to join us. Share up to 100 words about feedback in the comments below!

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Anonymous Feedback

Sarahah, an anonymous feedback system to be used by friends and coworkers alike, is the newest fad in social media. Although we at The Feedback Loop usually write articles about feedback and Magic, we also discuss how feedback affects the world around us. Sarahah prompted The Feedback Loop team to discuss anonymous feedback, and whether it deserves a place in the judge program. The Feedback Loop as the name implies, wholeheartedly supports a positive feedback culture. That being said, I don’t

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Flash Feedback Cards

Greetings all! I am Rob McKenzie, Level 3 judge and Regional Coordinator of the USA-North region. I’m here today to talk about a nifty item I’ve used at a couple events, Flash Feedback Cards. If you have been at a recent show with me, you have probably run across these - I’ve given them out to judges to distribute at GP Indy, GP Milwaukee, the most recent Minnesota RPTQ, and the SCG Open in Indy. I’ve also used them to provide feedback at several different shows where I did not give them

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Feedback for New L2s

As a teacher, I spend about 35% of my class time reviewing rather than teaching new content. Does that seem surprising to you? It shouldn’t. Consistent review helps us solidify understanding and connect what we’ve learned in the past with new information. As a result, feedback should regularly include the fundamentals of judging, which are important for judges of any level. After an introduction to scaling feedback and a framework for how to help L1s at various stages, let’s take a look

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