Dealing With Failures, Part Two

Olá a todos! (Hello, everyone!) In the first part, we got to learn a little bit more about failures: what they are, where they live, what they eat. Jokes aside, we spoke a bit about personal experiences and the impact it has on ourselves, our team, and ultimately our event and our customers - the players. In this part, we’ll talk a bit more on how to approach and tame the effects of failure. As I said before, failure always has a negative impact. However, that doesn’t mean it can’t

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Dealing With Failures, Part One

While very gratifying, the job of a judge isn’t always easy: along with hours of study and preparation, we also have numerous moments where we have to make difficult decisions during tournaments. As prepared as we may be, it’s difficult to anticipate every situation, and as a result, we make mistakes; mistakes that oftentimes cause disappointment for a player, fellow judge, or even accidentally interrupt the flow of the whole tournament.   These kinds of situations have a tendency

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Buying In

In a perfect world, feedback would would be freely given and freely received. Reviewers would be open and honest about what they had to say, and those being reviewed would open their minds to what others were saying, even if it wasn't necessarily what they want to hear. Unfortunately, we don't live in a perfect world, and it's a lot harder to provide feedback in a way that makes someone want to listen than it is to just write a review. As a reviewer, you need to figure out how to get your reader

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“You Always Do What You’re Told.”

I really enjoy working Side Events at a Grand Prix - there are tons of moving parts and it's a big puzzle to solve. There's usually a jam-packed schedule full of events as well as on-demand events launching whenever they fill. As such, it can sometimes be very stressful to be around the stage. I envy a number of scorekeepers in just how calm they are able to be when they have a multitude of different priorities flying in front of them. is one of those scorekeepers that I hold in high esteem. No

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Identity Triggers: Who Tells Your Story?

Several factors can cause us to reject instantaneously the feedback we receive. Sometimes the feedback strikes us as off-base, incorrect, or uniformed, causing a truth trigger. Other times we think their opinions or preconceptions of us are unfairly coloring their observations, causing a relationship trigger. And then there are times where what you are told violates a core belief you have about yourself. We call our reaction to this an identity trigger. What the other person is saying feels fundamentally

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What’s Your 100?

This week, The Feedback Loop continues its celebration of 100 posts with your thoughts on feedback. Many thanks to the dozens of judges from around the world who contributed! If you missed the deadline, it's not too late to join us. Share up to 100 words about feedback in the comments below!

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Celebrating 100 Posts!

Welcome to The Feedback Loop's 100th post! In celebration of this milestone, we as the blog staff have each written 100 words about feedback and a brief introduction to our involvement in the judge program. Join us next week for a continuation of the celebration with contributions from you, our readers!  

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Breakfast of Champions

Earlier this year I was the Head Judge of the SCG Modern Classic in Richmond, Virginia. During round one, I was out walking the floor and decided that I would take a call near me. As I delivered my ruling, I thought to myself:  “I’m in this shirt for a reason. I know this ruling; I know that I’m correct.” Spoilers: I was wrong. After walking away from the call, I was approached by one of my floor judges, . He asked me about the ruling and whether I was correct. I was still pretty

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On Shields and Feedback

Some time ago on this very blog I wrote about what it felt like to be recruited by Captain America himself to be a part of The Avengers. A little over two years after being recruited, asked if I’d like to pick up the shield. (Riki insists that he’s Nick Fury, but this is my article so we’re using my analogy.) I quickly accepted the shield and got to work on polishing it. So what shield am I talking about? The Feedback Loop? Sure, that’s part of it. But it’s more than that. What

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