Things You May Want to Know About Reviews (Before You Write Your Next Review)

Quite often someone will bring me a concern they have about a review, something that is keeping them from submitting it and providing their feedback. For my first contribution to The Feedback Loop in 2018, I’ve decided that I want to take some time to address some misconceptions and drop some knowledge bombs to help clear the air and get some people’s pens moving.   “Who can read reviews?” That’s a good question, in fact the one I received the most while doing some research

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Asking for Appreciation

When we discuss feedback in the judge program, usually we talk about coaching (communicating areas for improvement) or evaluation (providing context for how we view the capabilities of others by showing them where we think they rank). We also say asking for feedback, especially ahead of time, is useful in soliciting the type of feedback that you want to receive. This principle applies easily to these two different forms feedback can take.   A third type of feedback to consider is one for

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The Value of Emotional Feedback

In a recent conversation about reviews, a friend gave two reasons why they hadn’t written any recently. “I don’t have any constructive criticism.” “I don’t know that I have anything valuable to say.” These two statements are pervasive within the judge program. They’re also false.   When we’re writing our first few reviews as new judges, we’re usually told we must include constructive criticism. Of course, constructive criticism is important and in our early

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Self-Reviews Aren’t Solo-Reviews

I sit down to write a self review. I’ve been told that it’s good for me, it gives me a benchmark, it helps me gain perspective on my own opinion, it makes me better for the self review. I’ve got a blank page in front of me. That’s not helping. I go and check the qualities - yup. Can confirm, there’s stuff I’m bad at. Page is still blank. Writing a self review can be daunting. In the judge program, the term “Self Review” has connotations connecting it to the L3 process

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Feedback: A Communication Safety Feature

We’ve all experienced communication breakdowns. Sometimes there are technical factors, like bad reception or ambient noise. Sometimes there is a problem with effectiveness; the communicator is doing a poor job of selecting words. And sometimes there are semantic problems, those times when the intended message doesn’t match the received message. In day-to-day life, semantic problems in communication can cause some damage. Especially when they elicit identity triggers. Last week, used a personal

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Avenues for Local Feedback

However, all it really takes to have meaningful feedback is to have a conversation with someone else about a way one of you could improve. This person could be a player, a tournament organizer, or even a judge who was nowhere near your event. Let’s dig into some of these ideas, and how you can leverage them in your community.

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Anonymous Feedback

Sarahah, an anonymous feedback system to be used by friends and coworkers alike, is the newest fad in social media. Although we at The Feedback Loop usually write articles about feedback and Magic, we also discuss how feedback affects the world around us. Sarahah prompted The Feedback Loop team to discuss anonymous feedback, and whether it deserves a place in the judge program. The Feedback Loop as the name implies, wholeheartedly supports a positive feedback culture. That being said, I don’t

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Feedbag #13: Feedback on Sensitive Topics

Hello and welcome to this month’s edition of the Feedbag! Last time, we covered how to handle feedback from players. Our topic for this month comes from a new addition to our editing staff, Erin Leonard: “How do you give a judge feedback on a sensitive topic?” The sensitive topics in question here are things that would fall under the Unsporting Conduct policy at Competitive REL -- racial or sexual comments. Even though judges are generally awesome people, occasionally some of us do less than

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Feedback From Players

In the judge program, feedback takes on many forms - Flash Feedback, face to face feedback, self reviews, etc,. However, these forms of feedback typically come from your judge peers, whereas there’s another valuable source of feedback - your players. Your players are the mirror in which you can see whether everything you’ve spent time working on is actually working to make the event better for them. To that end, let’s look deeper at the feedback we receive from players. First off, player

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