Detecting, Identifying and Preventing Lying

Yes, preventing. But let's start with detection and identification!   We've all had to deal at least once with these situations where two players disagree on enough elements about the game that one of them is probably lying. That's what is often referred to as a "he said/she said situation" - a term created so long ago that it should totally disappear in favor of "they said/they said situation".   Detecting Lying? Before moving further down the road, it's important to assess

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A Floor Judge Investigation

I've written numerous articles about investigations that you can find at various places on this blog. Nearly all of them are written from the HJ point of view and while I selfishly believe they're instructive, I'm under the impression they don't achieve as much as they could. Indeed, like I've pointed in this article, there is no good HJ investigation without a great FJ investigation. This week-end at the WMC, I've happened to be on the Floor watching a match, during which a mistake occurred.

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Running a draft without stamped product

With Nationals approaching and since it’s likely very few of them will use stamped product, here is a procedure I’ve already successfully tried a few years ago at a Grand Prix whose stamped product was not be delivered on time.   Why are we usually using stamped product?   Stamped product allows each and every player to verify with a quick glance that the card their opponent is playing belongs to this draft.   This is a good start since, at the very least, it

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Backing up through a Fetchland

Warning: The example described here are meant to be at the ends of the Backup spectrum. Most situations won’t be as clear cut and small alterations in the presented scenarios may already affect the decision to backup or not. Take this article as it is: A presentation of some core reasonings you can use before making a ruling of yours!   If you make a ratio between complexity and recurrence, Backing up is certainly the most complex thing a judge has to do. I have already given some

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