Scaling Feedback for New L1s

Remember how it felt when you first heard “Welcome to Level 1?” I often ask judges why they joined the program, and as a result, I’ve heard a number of humorous and inspiring stories. No matter how different each judge’s reasons and motivations have been, stories about achieving Level 1 typically share a similar response to the achievement -- a combination of personal pride and self-conscious uncertainty at what comes next. This is why it is so important that we provide meaningful

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Feedbag #7: Leading a Horse to Water

Hello and welcome to the latest edition of the Feedbag! Last time, we covered the subject of review drafts. This month, our question is about how to help enable feedback when you’re in a leadership role: I’m team leading at an upcoming event, and I’d like to encourage my team to review each other. Do you recommend any strategies or approaches that have worked well in facilitating review exchanges and/or making sure that the reviews are actually written after the event? This question is actually

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Taking Selfies – Part Three

Over the last couple of months we’ve explored the general value of introspection and self reviews. This value is one of the reasons that the Level 3 Advancement Process requires a comprehensive Self Review (in caps to distinguish it from normal self reviews). It’s important for L3s to be able to examine themselves honestly and critically. This month I’ll go over four of the Qualities of a Premier Judge (L3), as well as offer quick tips for using these qualities to evaluate yourself with

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Feedbacklash

A lot of great stuff has been written about the feedback process, especially how to deliver it: Talk to the person first. Send a draft of the review in e-mail form. Balance the positive and negative feedback. Here’s the problem: these points are all centered on sparing the feelings of the person receiving the feedback. We spend no time discussing the feelings of the person giving the feedback. Have you ever given feedback to someone only to have them react defensively? Maybe you felt like

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Scaling Feedback

You know how excited parents celebrate their children’s first tottering attempts at walking? How they ooh and ah and cheer and gasp and take dozens of pictures to post on social media? When I visited my parents recently, they did not cheer even though I walked quite well. Obviously my parents love me, but they no longer celebrate when I walk across a room without falling. Why not? They now expect me to walk proficiently. While I may have been clumsy as a teenager, with a pair of designated

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Say Anything.

You know, writing and judging really have a lot in common. That probably has something to do with why I enjoy both of them so much. One of those things, one that it took me an incredibly long time to get over, is that it’s hard to know how you’re doing unless someone else tells you. This isn’t a solo quest. When you write something, you know what you meant to say. You know how you intended it to come across. You can clearly see the brilliance of your vision. And that’s the problem.

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My First Review – George Gavrilita

Welcome back to another edition of My First Review. Looking back on the first two reviews we’ve featured, I noticed that both were longer than a typical first review. While their length is by no means a bad thing, I don’t want to give judges the wrong idea of what to expect out of their first review. Reviews don’t have to be long. In fact, last week on The Feedback Loop, wrote an article advocating that less is often more. This brief first review comes to us courtesy of of Torino,

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My First Review – Joe Wiesenberg

Welcome back to another edition of My First Review. A judge’s first review usually comes from an event they’ve judged, but rarely is the event their first. Why is that? Perhaps there’s just so much going on when you judge that writing reviews falls by the wayside. It could be that, as judges, we have to go out of our way to observe our fellow judges. But what if there is another way to observe a judge? A way that doesn’t distract you from what you’re trying to do at an event? Despite

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My First Review – Adam Eidelsafy

Welcome back to My First Review! In last month’s introduction to this feature, I told you how the first review I received influenced the first review I wrote and ultimately began my interest in this project. Today, using my actual first review, I’m going to begin our series of features by showing you my first review. Let’s see what we can learn. THE BACKSTORY Two factors led me to get that first review done, a very enthusiastic , and my L2 Advancement. You can read the full story

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Leveling Up Your Verbal Feedback

As an educator, I constantly notice educational processes at work in the judge program. When we’re not learning how interacts with or what to do when a player doesn't discard a card to , we’re teaching players about why they receive a Warning for missing their trigger. In the realm of the ideal where judges and players alike are completely logical and absolutely confident that what the comprehensive rules literally say is literally true, these educational moments are straightforward. But

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