Identity Triggers: Who Tells Your Story?

Several factors can cause us to reject instantaneously the feedback we receive. Sometimes the feedback strikes us as off-base, incorrect, or uniformed, causing a truth trigger. Other times we think their opinions or preconceptions of us are unfairly coloring their observations, causing a relationship trigger. And then there are times where what you are told violates a core belief you have about yourself. We call our reaction to this an identity trigger. What the other person is saying feels fundamentally

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Accepter le feedback : le positif, le négatif, et le reste (première partie)

(Article d’origine publié le 9 mai 2017 par Erin Leonard, traduit par Morgane Costaire) Si l’on se demande comment fournir un retour efficace après un événement, les articles sont nombreux. Il n’en est pas de même lorsqu’il s’agit de recevoir ce retour. Les arbitres font beaucoup d’efforts pour fournir un feedback de qualité au travers des reviews, des nominations exemplar ou lors d’une simple conversation. Qu’en faisons-nous après l’avoir reçu ? Parfois nous pouvons

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What’s Your 100?

This week, The Feedback Loop continues its celebration of 100 posts with your thoughts on feedback. Many thanks to the dozens of judges from around the world who contributed! If you missed the deadline, it's not too late to join us. Share up to 100 words about feedback in the comments below!

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Celebrating 100 Posts!

Welcome to The Feedback Loop's 100th post! In celebration of this milestone, we as the blog staff have each written 100 words about feedback and a brief introduction to our involvement in the judge program. Join us next week for a continuation of the celebration with contributions from you, our readers!  

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Avenues for Local Feedback

However, all it really takes to have meaningful feedback is to have a conversation with someone else about a way one of you could improve. This person could be a player, a tournament organizer, or even a judge who was nowhere near your event. Let’s dig into some of these ideas, and how you can leverage them in your community.

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Anonymous Feedback

Sarahah, an anonymous feedback system to be used by friends and coworkers alike, is the newest fad in social media. Although we at The Feedback Loop usually write articles about feedback and Magic, we also discuss how feedback affects the world around us. Sarahah prompted The Feedback Loop team to discuss anonymous feedback, and whether it deserves a place in the judge program. The Feedback Loop as the name implies, wholeheartedly supports a positive feedback culture. That being said, I don’t

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Accepter le feedback : le positif, le négatif, et le reste (troisième partie)

Le feedback positif se réfère à nos points forts et le feedback négatif à ce que nous pourrions améliorer. Il nous reste à nous intéresser au feedback déroutant, difficile à comprendre ou simplement faux. Que pouvons-nous faire de ce feedback ? Le manque de clarté est un obstacle à l’utilisation efficace de ce retour. Demander des éclaircissements. Le feedback n’est pas gravé dans la pierre, c’est un processus en constant renouvellement. Il ne faut pas hésiter à demander

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Investigating My Failed Panel

At the end of Saturday at SCG Baltimore, I reviewed my notebook in amazement at the number of complex calls I had taken. Calls that made me wonder about the motivations of players who shuffled an opponent’s library when counting how many cards remained in the library. Played an through their own on 1. Used a to find a . Twice. The event felt like a series of one investigation after another. Where did they all come from? In GP Richmond a few weeks earlier, calls seemed much simpler. Were

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Accepting Feedback: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (Part 3)

We’ve talked about “good” and “bad” feedback as being things we did well and things we can work on, but what about when you get “ugly” feedback? The kind when someone says something that is confusing, difficult to conceptualize, or just plain wrong. What do you do with feedback like that? It’s hard to know how to address it or how to utilize it when the feedback itself is unclear. Ask for clarification. Feedback isn’t set in stone – it’s an ongoing process. Don’t be

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