Asking for Appreciation

When we discuss feedback in the judge program, usually we talk about coaching (communicating areas for improvement) or evaluation (providing context for how we view the capabilities of others by showing them where we think they rank). We also say asking for feedback, especially ahead of time, is useful in soliciting the type of feedback that you want to receive. This principle applies easily to these two different forms feedback can take.   A third type of feedback to consider is one for

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Dealing With Failures, Part Three

Mais uma vez, olá a todos! (Once again, hello everyone!) We’ve talked about the nature of the beast. We’ve talked about how to tame the beast. This time, however, we’ll talk about ourselves - mostly, what do we do once we’ve taken control of the impact failure has, and how we use that in the future. This will ensure that not only we succeed instead of fail, but can teach others from our experience.   Ask for and accept help Even harder than admitting your mistakes to

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Dealing With Failures, Part Two

Olá a todos! (Hello, everyone!) In the first part, we got to learn a little bit more about failures: what they are, where they live, what they eat. Jokes aside, we spoke a bit about personal experiences and the impact it has on ourselves, our team, and ultimately our event and our customers - the players. In this part, we’ll talk a bit more on how to approach and tame the effects of failure. As I said before, failure always has a negative impact. However, that doesn’t mean it can’t

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Dealing With Failures, Part One

While very gratifying, the job of a judge isn’t always easy: along with hours of study and preparation, we also have numerous moments where we have to make difficult decisions during tournaments. As prepared as we may be, it’s difficult to anticipate every situation, and as a result, we make mistakes; mistakes that oftentimes cause disappointment for a player, fellow judge, or even accidentally interrupt the flow of the whole tournament.   These kinds of situations have a tendency

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Mentoring

Mentoring. Mentor. Mentee. If you had to choose only one concept to pair with the judge program, most people would nod their head towards this one. From day one as a judge candidate to judges at highest levels of leadership in the program, it is everywhere. I came to judging from an educational background, so I didn’t really think twice about mentoring since it was already a large part of what I did with my time. But as I started prepping for writing an overview of what mentoring is, I came

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Mentoring

Mentorat. Mentor. Elève. Si vous deviez choisir un seul concept à associer au programme arbitral, la plupart des gens pencherait pour celui-ci. Du premier jour d'un simple candidat à l’arbitrage avec les plus hauts niveaux de leadership dans le programme, ce concept est partout. Je me suis lancée dans l'arbitrage alors que j'avais déjà une formation pédagogique. De ce fait, je n'ai pas eu à réfléchir à la façon d'aborder le mentorat car je le pratiquais au quotidien. Mais lorsque

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Buying In

In a perfect world, feedback would would be freely given and freely received. Reviewers would be open and honest about what they had to say, and those being reviewed would open their minds to what others were saying, even if it wasn't necessarily what they want to hear. Unfortunately, we don't live in a perfect world, and it's a lot harder to provide feedback in a way that makes someone want to listen than it is to just write a review. As a reviewer, you need to figure out how to get your reader

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Feedback: A Communication Safety Feature

We’ve all experienced communication breakdowns. Sometimes there are technical factors, like bad reception or ambient noise. Sometimes there is a problem with effectiveness; the communicator is doing a poor job of selecting words. And sometimes there are semantic problems, those times when the intended message doesn’t match the received message. In day-to-day life, semantic problems in communication can cause some damage. Especially when they elicit identity triggers. Last week, used a personal

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“You Always Do What You’re Told.”

I really enjoy working Side Events at a Grand Prix - there are tons of moving parts and it's a big puzzle to solve. There's usually a jam-packed schedule full of events as well as on-demand events launching whenever they fill. As such, it can sometimes be very stressful to be around the stage. I envy a number of scorekeepers in just how calm they are able to be when they have a multitude of different priorities flying in front of them. is one of those scorekeepers that I hold in high esteem. No

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Accepter le feedback : le positif, le négatif, et le reste (deuxième partie)

Dans la première partie nous avons vu comment le feedback positif peut nous aider à améliorer nos pratiques. Notre prochaine étape nous amène maintenant à nous pencher sur l’importance du feedback négatif. Nous savons déjà que les « axes d’amélioration » fournissent une liste de choses que nous pourrions mieux faire. Voyons comment passer du feedback à des actions concrètes. Demander de l’aide. Si vous avez du mal avec un aspect du travail d’arbitre, il y a des chances

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