A spectator’s role at FNM, a PTQ or Grand Prix day 2.

Whether you're at your local FNM, watching a match because you already finished your match, or you're at a Grand Prix watching your friend play, it's not uncommon to see spectators watching matches. So what is expected of a spectator watching a match? First off, you should be a silent observer. You can say some things, like 'hi' or whether you won or lost your last match, but you shouldn't make any comment on any game play decision while they're playing the game. This can be considered outside

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Tournament Tuesday: Life Totals

This is an older 'change' than the Missed Trigger update a little while back, but it's one we haven't really covered. One of the toughest things for a Judge to figure out is a life total discrepancy; when Player A says he's at one life total, and Player B insists that he's at another. In cases like this, it's up to the Judge to figure out which player is right. So how can you avoid sticky situations like that? The first one is to keep track of life totals in a very methodical manner; many people

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Tournament Tuesday: Changes to the Missed Trigger Policy

Taking a little break from the Return to Ravnica previews, we'll do our normal Tournament Tuesday tip. NOTE: All of this only matters at Competitive REL and higher—stuff like PTQs and GPTs and GPs—and it won't go into effect until October 1st. At your local FNM and at the Return to Ravnica prerelease this weekend, you're still required to point out your opponent's triggers, and they'll still happen even if you'd prefer they didn't, just as they have for a long time now. And at any Competitive

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New! Each life total change must be verbally announced with the new life totals.

At the start of any game, both players should explain to each other the method that they plan on using to keep track of life totals. Whichever method they choose must be accessible by both players to record life totals consistently. Each life total change should be verbally announced and recorded. If a player notices a discrepancy in life total, they must immediately point it out to clear it up right away. If they don't say anything in order to later gain advantage, that's a Very Bad Thing, and Very

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What is “Private Information” ?

Communication Policy Part 3: What is "Private Information" ? The third type of information laid out by the Magic Tournament Rules is Private Information. (See here and here for the first two posts on communication policy. Private Information is officially anything which is neither free nor derived; more practically, though, it is information to which either only a single player or no player has immediate access. A player is not obligated to directly answer a question from their opponent for

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What is “Derived Information” ?

Communication Policy Part 2: What is "Derived Information" ? The second type of information laid out by the Magic Tournament Rules is Derived Information. Derived Information is information to which all players are entitled access, but might require some degree of skill or calculation in order to determine. If you have to think about or figure something out during the game, it is likely derived information; specific items considered derived information include: * The number of any type of objects

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What is “Public Information”?

Communication Policy Part 1: What is "Public Information" ? It is important to make sure you communicate clearly with your opponent during a tournament.  First, it makes the game flow much more smoothly and, second, the game is a lot more fun if you don't have to argue about what happened. The first type of information laid out by the Magic Tournament Rules is Public Information.  Public Information is information to which all players are entitled complete access; this information must be clearly

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